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Predatory Publishing: Home

What it is and what you can do to protect your academic reputation

Request for consultation with Librarian

If you would like help from me, please send a consultation request indicating the day and time you would like to meet.  You can use the email link in my "Personal Librarian" box on the right side of this guide.

Document Delivery

Use Texas Tech Library's Document Delivery Service to request free electronic copies of articles, standards, or patents delivered to you by email within 48 hours.  Use the link below and follow directions carefully. 

Background information

With the rise of open access publishing, some publishers now charge author fees as a way to finance the cost of publishing articles without having to charge subscription fees.  However, some publishers have begun to take advantage of the author pays model and require payment from authors without providing adequate editorial services.  The result is that articles are often solicited and accepted for publication in new journals without the customary peer review and editing that is characteristic of established journals.  These predatory journals often have scientific names and list prominent academics on their editorial boards without their permission, making them difficult to distinguish from legitimate journals and publishers.  The PowerPoint presentation below analyzes the characteristics of predatory journals and outline strategies that scholars can take to identify them and ensure that their research is only submitted to quality journals and reputable publishers.

Subject Guide

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Brian Quinn
Contact:
Reference Room Mezzanine M 113
806-834-2148