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Web Accessibility

General Guide and Best Practices for Creating Acccessible Web Content

What is the WCAG?

The WGAC stands for "Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG)"
These guidelines are developed through the W3C process in cooperation with individuals and organizations around the world, with a goal of providing a single shared standard for web content accessibility that meets the needs of individuals, organizations, and governments internationally.
The WCAG documents explain how to make web content more accessible to people with disabilities. Web “content” generally refers to the information in a web page or web application, including:
  • natural information such as text, images, and sounds
  • code or markup that defines structure, presentation, etc.

WCAG 2

What is in the WCAG 2 Documents

WCAG 2.0 and WCAG 2.1 are stable, referenceable technical standards. They have 12-13 guidelines that are organized under 4 principles: perceivable, operable, understandable, and robust. For each guideline, there are testable success criteria, which are at three levels: A, AA, and AAA.
For a short summary of the WCAG 2 guidelines, see WCAG 2.1 at a Glance.
To learn about web accessibility principles and guidelines, see Accessibility Principles.